We believe our corner of North Wales is the most stunning and beautiful in the whole of the UK. However we might be a bit biased! But we can’t be far wrong as we have everything to tailor for a visitor to our region. From our relaxing coastline to our accessible mountains you will be sure to find a great day out in the outdoors in this Year of Discovery in Wales. Below are a few places that you certainly don’t want to miss on your visit to North East Wales.

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct
Pontcysyllte Aqueduct – UNESCO World Heritage Site

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and canal consists of a continuous group of civil engineering features from the heroic phase of transport improvements during the British Industrial Revolution.  The canal brought water borne transport from the English lowlands into the rugged terrain of the Welsh uplands, using innovative techniques to cross two major river valleys and the ridge between them.  It was built between 1795 and 1808 by two outstanding figures in the development of civil engineering: Thomas Telford and William Jessop.  Through their dynamic relationship the canal became a testing ground for new ideas that were carried forward into subsequent engineering practice internationally.

Dare you cross it? And can you do it without looking down? You can walk across Pontcysyllte, or save your legs and take a leisurely boat ride. But there’s one thing you have to take with you. A camera. The views are something else. However be sure to explore the whole 11 miles of stunning world heritage than spans from the market town of Llangollen all the way to the border with our neighbours in England.

Talacre Beach

Talacre Beach
Talacre Beach

The popular beach of Talacre sits just across the River Dee from the Wirral over the English / Welsh border. With miles of golden sand backed by dunes Talacre has plenty of room for everyone. Much of the year this wouldn’t seem an issue as you may well get the beach to yourself. However, there are a number of holiday parks and caravan sites just over the dunes meaning there is quite an influx during the summer.

The area around the beach and dunes is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) with rare species including a collection of natterjack toads. Just around the corner, the Dee estuary is a haven for wintering birds with little terns, skylarks, meadow pipits and warblers all spotted here.

The Clwydian Range and Dee Valley

Clwydian Range and Dee Valley
Clwydian Range and Dee Valley

The Clwydian Range and Dee valley is the scenic gateway of North Wales, embracing some of the UKs most wonderful landscapes.

The Clwydian Range is an unmistakable chain of purple heather-clad summits, topped by Britain’s most dramatically situated hill-forts. Beyond the windswept Horseshoe Pass, over Llantysilio Mountain, lies the glorious Dee Valley with the historic towns of Llangollen and Corwen, rich in cultural and industrial buildings. Walking the Clwydian Range and Dee Valley is the best way to escape from the stresses of life and re-discover yourself. With it’s highly accessible walks you are bound to find the perfect walk for all abilities and difficulty so that all can enjoy being outdoors and getting some fresh air.

See a great guide to all Clwydian Range Walks here

Erddig Hall and Chirk Castle

Erddig Hall
Erddig Hall, Wrexham

Explore a much-loved home, garden and estate filled with the stories of a family and their servants. Sitting on a dramatic escarpment above the winding Clywedog river, Erddig tells the 250-year story of a gentry family’s relationship with its servants. Set within the stunning Ceirog Valley, Erddig Hall is a places for all ages to unwind and find out much more about North East Wales culture whilst travelling back in time and seeing what life was like for the servants and occupants of the hall.

A stark symbol of power, Chirk Castle was completed in 1310 during the reign of the conquering Edward I to subdue the last princes of Wales. Built on an outcrop above the meeting point of the rivers Dee and Ceiriog, the imposing silhouette of the castle was a brooding statement of English intent in these disputed lands. Chirk Castle has over 480 acres of estate parkland for you to explore, with wild ponies, sheep, veteran trees, and a beautifully preserved section of Offa’s Dyke. The estate is located within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and has also been designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest as an important habitat for rare invertebrates, bats, fungi, and wild flowers.

Ruthin Gaol

Ruthin Gaol
Ruthin Gaol

Ruthin gaol is the only purpose-built Pentonville style prison open to the public as a heritage attraction. People can spend time exploring its nooks and crannies and learn about life in the Victorian prison system. See how the prisoners lived their daily lives: what they ate, how they worked, and the punishments they suffered.

Explore the cells including the punishment, ‘dark’ and condemned cell. Find out about the Welsh Houdini and William Hughes who was the last man to be hanged there.

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